Wednesday, March 09, 2005

Fruit trees in public spaces

Lucky Vancouverites will soon be seeing more apple, pear, chestnut, and hazelnut trees in public spaces. Besides just increasing access to deliciously fresh foods, the fruit tree project will also encourage chemical-free growing, food bank donations, exercise (and walking to get food also equals fewer emissions), and cold storage for year-round community food security. Wow, it sounds like a win-win-win...

Yesterday, WorldChanging noted a related effort by a group called Village Harvest in Santa Clara Valley, CA. And if you've been missing out on the other wonderful conversations at WorldChanging recently, then, well, you've been missing out.

13 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Your blog is excellent - keep it up! Don't miss visiting this site about fast food

3:19 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Would anyone like a vacation certificate for FREE hotel rooms ($400 value)? You can choose from twenty fantastic resort locations.

I am trying to find people interested in maybe improving their dental health. If you are interested in dental health Please visit my website.

I am personally giving away FREE vacation certificates to ALL new customers. There is a 60 day money back guarantee on my product if you don't like it, but the vacation certificate for FREE hotel rooms is yours to keep. A $400 value!

I look forward to hearing about your awesome vacation, not to mention the improvement with your dental health.

6:00 PM  
Anonymous plants said...

Hi, I was just checking out some bloggs and found yours! Great Site, I like it! If you have a moment, please visit my site gardening It isn’t anything special but you may still find something of interest.

7:02 PM  
Anonymous rose varieties said...

Hi there,

I just ran across your site and enjoyed reading through everything.

I'm trying to get a blog going on my site too. But I dont think i have the patience to do it!

--Amy
My rose garden Site

1:03 AM  
Anonymous care for roses said...

Hi there,

I just ran across your site and enjoyed reading through everything.

I'm trying to get a blog going on my site too. But I dont think i have the patience to do it!

--Amy
My square foot gardening Site

7:40 PM  
Anonymous home equity line of credit said...

A

7:35 AM  
Anonymous gardening rose tip said...

Bloggs are such a wonderful way to plublish ones thoughts. Thanks for letting me visit and leave a comment. Love the title, "Fruit trees in public spaces" Come by my site some time. It's got gardening organic rose related stuff.

8:48 AM  
Blogger James Baker said...

I was searching blogs,and I found your site.Please,
accept my congratulations for your excellent work!
If you have a moment, please visit my site:
reverse mortgages
It pretty much covers reverse mortgages related issues.
Have a good day!

6:15 PM  
Anonymous gardening nut said...

Howdy, I'm just a retiree from Wyoming surfing around the net and looking for
interesting blogs. Came across your blog and thought I 'd say hello. You've done
some nice work here. Keep on bloggin, my friend.

Regards,
Jake


shade gardening

9:39 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Pest control in the perennial garden
http://home-gardening.blogspot.com/
If you have any good tips please post trhem on my blog

One of the many advantages of growing perennials is the ability of these beautiful flowers to return to full bloom season after season. While this ability to bloom repeatedly is one of the things that makes perennials so special, it also introduces a number of important factors into your gardening plan. One of the most important of these is a proper pest control regimen.

While a garden full of annuals starts each season as a blank slate, the perennial garden is essentially a work in progress. The fact that the plants stay in the ground through winter makes things like proper pruning, disease management and pest control very important. If the garden bed is not prepared properly after the current growing season, chances are the quality of the blooms will suffer when the next season rolls around.

One of the most important factors to a successful perennial pest control regimen is the attention and vigilance of the gardener. As the gardener, you are in the best position to notice any changes in the garden, such as spots on the leaves, holes in the leaves, or damage to the stems. Any one of these could indicate a problem such as pest infestation or a disease outbreak.

It is important to nip any such problem in the bud, since a disease outbreak or pest infestation can easily spread to take over an entire garden. Fortunately for the gardener, there are a number of effective methods for controlling both common pests and frequently seen plant diseases.

Some of these methods are chemical in nature, such as insecticides and fungicides, while others are more natural, like using beneficial insects to control harmful ones. While both approaches have their advantages and disadvantages, many gardeners prefer to try the natural approach first, both for the health of the garden and the environment.

There is an additional benefit of the natural approach that many gardeners are unaware of. These days, it is very popular to combine a koi pond with a garden, for a soothing, relaxing environment. If you do plan to incorporate some type of fish pond into your garden landscape, it is critical to avoid using any type of insecticide or fungicide near the pond, since it could seep into the water and poison the fish. Fish are extremely sensitive to chemicals in the environment, especially with a closed environment like a pond.

As with any health issue, for people or plants, prevention is the best strategy to disease control and pest control alike. The best defense for the gardener is to grow a garden full of the healthiest, most vigorous plants possible. Whenever possible, varieties of plants bred to be disease or pest resistant should be used. There are a number of perennials that, through selective breeding, are quite resistant to the most common plant diseases, so it is a good idea to seek them out.

Happy gardening,
Stan
http://yourebooksuperstore.com/vegetable/

2:38 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Pest control in the perennial garden
http://home-gardening.blogspot.com/
If you have any good tips please post trhem on my blog

One of the many advantages of growing perennials is the ability of these beautiful flowers to return to full bloom season after season. While this ability to bloom repeatedly is one of the things that makes perennials so special, it also introduces a number of important factors into your gardening plan. One of the most important of these is a proper pest control regimen.

While a garden full of annuals starts each season as a blank slate, the perennial garden is essentially a work in progress. The fact that the plants stay in the ground through winter makes things like proper pruning, disease management and pest control very important. If the garden bed is not prepared properly after the current growing season, chances are the quality of the blooms will suffer when the next season rolls around.

One of the most important factors to a successful perennial pest control regimen is the attention and vigilance of the gardener. As the gardener, you are in the best position to notice any changes in the garden, such as spots on the leaves, holes in the leaves, or damage to the stems. Any one of these could indicate a problem such as pest infestation or a disease outbreak.

It is important to nip any such problem in the bud, since a disease outbreak or pest infestation can easily spread to take over an entire garden. Fortunately for the gardener, there are a number of effective methods for controlling both common pests and frequently seen plant diseases.

Some of these methods are chemical in nature, such as insecticides and fungicides, while others are more natural, like using beneficial insects to control harmful ones. While both approaches have their advantages and disadvantages, many gardeners prefer to try the natural approach first, both for the health of the garden and the environment.

There is an additional benefit of the natural approach that many gardeners are unaware of. These days, it is very popular to combine a koi pond with a garden, for a soothing, relaxing environment. If you do plan to incorporate some type of fish pond into your garden landscape, it is critical to avoid using any type of insecticide or fungicide near the pond, since it could seep into the water and poison the fish. Fish are extremely sensitive to chemicals in the environment, especially with a closed environment like a pond.

As with any health issue, for people or plants, prevention is the best strategy to disease control and pest control alike. The best defense for the gardener is to grow a garden full of the healthiest, most vigorous plants possible. Whenever possible, varieties of plants bred to be disease or pest resistant should be used. There are a number of perennials that, through selective breeding, are quite resistant to the most common plant diseases, so it is a good idea to seek them out.

Happy gardening,
Stan
http://yourebooksuperstore.com/vegetable/

5:09 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

It is rather interesting for me to read the post. Thanks for it. I like such themes and anything that is connected to this matter. I definitely want to read a bit more on that blog soon.

4:43 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Rather cool place you've got here. Thanx for it. I like such topics and anything that is connected to this matter. BTW, why don't you change design :).

12:27 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home